Doll House: Miniature Worlds of Wonder

EXHIBITION

22 July – 29 August 2021

Como House and Garden

Corner Williams Rd & Lechlade Ave
South Yarra, Victoria 3141

Tickets: https://dollhousecomo.com/about

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Over July and August my miniature work, Baba Yaga Hut, is featured in the exhibition, ‘Doll House: Miniature Worlds of Wonder’, presented by the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) at Como House and Garden.

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“Step inside the doll house and lose yourself in a miniature world of wonder and intrigue.

Explore the doll house from its traditional form to the space it occupies in the virtual and intangible worlds.

Get up close to over 40 doll houses, many previously unseen from the 1880s to the present day. Together with furniture, accessories, ephemera and virtual experiences, Doll House: Miniature Worlds of Wonder unlocks the imagination of makers, collectors, activists and players and reveals the stories hidden in their worlds.”

Source National Trust of Australia (Victoria)

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FURTHER INFORMATION:

https://dollhousecomo.com/about 

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ASSOCIATED EVENTS:
Curator Talk
Select Thursdays from 24 June
Peek behind the scenes
Hear the stories directly from the curator, Dr Annette Shiell, and discover more about the houses, objects and concepts that combine to create this magical exhibition experience.

Melbourne Design Week 2021

EPISTOLARY

26 March 2021 – ongoing

Melbourne Design Week

EpistolaryOnline exhibition and workshopshttps://epistolary.love/

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I am delighted to be working with Paul Yacoumis on EPISTOLARY, an online exhibition and a programme of events as a part of Melbourne Design Week 2021, an initiative of Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV.

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Epistolary is a digital exhibition and self-guided tour of the city featuring a collection of ‘love letters’ to Melbourne. Through an evolving gallery the exhibition explores what makes local places and spaces unique, and includes online workshops that provide an opportunity to create and share your own love letter to places you care about

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In the lead up to the launch on March 26th, you can find out more here:

Melbourne Design Week 2021 programme

Epistolary Instagram page: @epistolary.love

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EPISTOLARY EVENTS

EPISTOLARY LAUNCH

March 26th 2021, 12pm – ongoing

Love letters go live! Head to the Epistolary website to view the first love letters to Melbourne and add your own to to the evolving gallery, which will be updated throughout Melbourne Design Week.

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RMIT WORKSHOP – Designer love: Expressing care for place

March 29th 2021, 10am-12pm

This invitation only RMIT University online workshop is led by Tarryn Handcock and Paul Yacoumis with Alice Lewis and Lisa Carroll. During this session, RMIT’s School of Fashion and Textiles first year students consider how designers can play a role in ways we care and connect with the world around us, and respond to the question, ‘is this love?’

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PUBLIC WORKSHOP – A Lovers’ Discourse: Write a love letter to Melbourne

March 31st, 6pm-7.30pm

In this public online workshop led by Tarryn Handcock and Paul Yacoumis with rute chaves and Amandine Thomas, we ask: Why do you fall in love with particular places? What’s the most creative way you can express your love for a city? Join in conversation with the panel of artists and designers as they guide you through creating your own love letter to the world around you, and playfully approach caring and connecting with place.

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CURATORIAL TEAM

TARRYN HANDCOCK

Dr Tarryn Handcock is a cross-disciplinary designer, artist and academic in the School of Fashion and Textiles at RMIT University. Her work investigates fashion spaces and places, including relationships between people, place and dress. Through her work she is interested in the capacity for design to inspire storytelling; recent projects explore discourse, duration and dressing practices at an urban scale. She is also a life-long letter writer.

PAUL YACOUMIS

Paul Yacoumis is a part-time musician, writer, science nerd, social critic, coder, and armchair philosopher. He currently works at the intersection of data science, innovation, and public policy. The common thread: A dedication to exploring and improving the human condition, and inspiring renewed wonder and critical thinking in an increasingly fragmented world. He also likes making pretty things.

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IFFTI x RMIT Workshop

IFFTI x RMIT Workshop

‘CRITICAL CONVERSATIONS’

3-5pm, 10 March 2021

School of Fashion & Textiles

RMIT University

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I will be presenting as part of a panel for the upcoming IFFTI x RMIT Workshop, ‘Critical Conversations’.

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‘Ethical and sustainability practices, material innovation and the digital transformation is changing the fashion and textiles industry requires us to work in more collaborative ways and within planetary boundaries.’

This conversation brings course leaders together, of two courses codelivered to all first-year fashion and textiles students. We discuss how interdisciplinary learnings enable students to develop shared language sets around sustainability and materials, and to recognise and establish relationships between disciplinary sectors.

Convenors: Associate Dean (Technology) Dr Jenny Underwood with Dr Tarryn Handcock and Verity Prideaux (Place and Story), Dr Georgia McCorkill (Fashion Design Reuse) and Dr Saniyat Islam (Sustainable Materials).

FURTHER INFORMATION:

IFFTI Workshop Poster 5.03.2021

Critical Fashion Studies Conference

Critical Fashion Studies Conference

27 – 29 February 2020

School of Culture and Communication

University of Melbourne  

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I will be presenting a paper on research at the upcoming conference on the collaborative project Dr Tassia Joannides and I have been undertaking on relationships between fashion and walking.

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Abstract: Designing urban site-responsive fashion.

Urban spaces and places offer up the potential for dynamic site-responsive design and presentation approaches. Yet in fashion, site-responsive design practice has been largely overlooked. Despite an increasing interest in localism there has been a surprising lack of practical inquiry into how disciplinary understandings of locality can be formed and how a sense of place can play a role in fashion design and presentation. Through a case study of two fashion design courses run by Tarryn Handcock and Tassia Joannides, located in (and responding to) Brunswick and Victoria Harbour, it is proposed that becoming an ‘urban flâneur’ can be a methodology for building  understandings of the local in fashion design and pedagogy. By reconceiving Walter Benjamin’s nineteenth century flâneur as an embodied subject who actively observes and produces fashion in the urban environment, practices of ‘urban flâneurie’, including inhabiting, observing and engaging with urban sites, are presented as a methodology for fashion designers to recognise, develop and communicate situated knowledges. Drawing out these knowledges, which might reflect specific material, historical, political, and disciplinary circumstances, as well as socially embedded narratives of place, could enable designers to build critical understandings of how fashion practice can mitigate, control, inform and enhance experiences (Potvin 2009) and perceptions of space and place. This methodology demonstrates the potential for fashion to expand interdisciplinary spatio-cultural discourse of site and contribute valuable understandings to how local practices can actively shape an urban context, including through public engagement events.

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FURTHER INFORMATION:

Critical Fashion Studies Conference website

Design Tasmania Artist Talk

DESIGN LAB TALK: BODY FUTURE

16 January 2020, 11.20am for 11.30am start

Design Tasmania

Corner of Brisbane St + Tamar St

Launceston TAS

Free MONA FOMA event

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Design Tasmania invites you to a conversation between artist Tarryn Handcock and curator Claire Beale, as a part of the Body Future exhibition presented by Design Tasmania for MONA FOMA:

“Tarryn Handcock is a cross-disciplinary design practitioner and lecturer within the School of Fashion and Textiles at RMIT University (Melbourne). Her practice integrates jewellery and object making techniques as well as critically reflective design process strategies including writing, drawing, and speculative scenarios. The Dust Project asked 100 people to participate in a practice based investigation collecting 200 dust samples, a ‘culture’ that combines particulates from living human bodies, garments, and the spaces they inhabit. This ongoing speculative project is a launching point for thinking about three key themes in the context of design: the duration of human bodies and dress, how dress can wear and be worn in relation to a changing body, and the ethics of bodies and dust.

The skins and cells of our moving, breathing bodies disperse into the world, mingling with foreign matter and waste as we pass through space. It is an unsettling and permanent presence, marginal and transitional, without site or bounds.
–Tarryn Handcock”

MONA FOMA 2020

BODY FUTURE

15 January – 1 March 2020

Design Tasmania

Corner of Brisbane St + Tamar St

Launceston TAS

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Opening: Wednesday 15 January 5pm @ Design Tasmania

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I am delighted to be exhibiting with Alice Potts as a part of the Body Future exhibition presented by Design Tasmania for MONA FOMA in 2020. 

“In a world where fast fashion is failing our future, how could we transform the daily impact of our bodies to be of use to the planet? The answer could lie in our sweat or even our dead skin and dander according to two designers: Alice Potts from Royal College of the Arts (London) and Tarryn Handcock from RMIT (Melbourne).” – Design Tasmania

FURTHER INFORMATION:

MONA FOMA 2020

Design Tasmania

New Publication: The Meeting of Aesthetics and Ethics in the Academy

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I am pleased to announce that my writing is featured in the newly released book, The Meeting of Aesthetics and Ethics in the Academy: Challenges for Creative Practice Researchers in Higher Education.

My chapter, ‘Touch and trace: Ethical methodologies for a phenomenological skin’, which addresses how Australian ethical guidelines can be applied in practice to living skin and abject human biomatter (skin dust). It also raises questions about how human data can be treated ethically through research practices.

According to the publisher: ‘The Meeting of Aesthetics and Ethics in the Academy provides a deep understanding of the nuances of ethics in the creative environment and contributes to the critical exploration of the nature of research ethics in higher education.

Written by world-renown academics with a wealth of experience in this field, this volume explores ethical challenges and responses across a range of creative practices and disciplines including design, documentary film making, journalism, socially engaged arts and the visual arts. It addresses the complex negotiations that creative practice researchers in higher education undertake to ensure that the ethical compliance required does not undermine the research integrity and artistic aspirations. By presenting carefully considered challenges to accepted models of research, this book illustrates critical analysis through a variety of case studies and anecdotal examples that provide an insight into improved ethics practices and policies in higher education.

This book is perfect for academics, ethics administrators, higher degree research candidates and supervisors looking to engage further in creative practice research and wanting to explore and understand its ethical oversight.’

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BOOK NOW AVAILABLE THROUGH ROUTLEDGE 

Turning digital geology into art

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

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EXHIBITION

 19 – 31 August 2019

Testing Grounds

1 City Road, Southbank VIC

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You can find me on site at the following times:

Wednesday 21 August 11am-6pm
Friday 23 August 11am-6pm
Saturday 24 August 11am – 6pm
Wednesday 28 August 6pm-8pm
Friday 30 August 11am-6pm
Saturday 31 August 11am-6pm

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This month I am Artist in Residence for the exhibition, ‘Turning digital geology into art’. Work developed during the residency will respond to 3.5 million years of geologic data unearthed by global engineering and consulting firm, Golder.

“Golder has been engaged by Development Victoria to undertake geotechnical investigations and assess the Testing Grounds site for future development.”

“Golder’s experts have adopted the latest digital engineering tools to develop 3D models to present the geology of the site – and then turned them into art to showcase how the fascinating geology of Melbourne’s arts precinct evolved over the last 3.5 million years.   

The main model has been 3D-printed to be featured in the exhibition along with geological core samples, multimedia and other pieces providing geological information about the site.

As part of the exhibition, Golder has commissioned local artist and fashion designer Tarryn Handcock to create an installation in the space, and throughout the site, demonstrating how geological data can be interpreted and applied to other fields of knowledge.”

“With a fashion practice that explores dress at an urban scale, she will be populating the site with soft rocks, faux minerals, precious dust, and plastiglomerate propositions for the new geological age”

“Landscape architect Luella Exton is also responding to the data with collage and two-dimensional works.”

Source: Testing Grounds Upcoming Calendar

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FURTHER INFORMATION:

Turning Digital Geology into Art

Topos III

Artificial Geology

Gold(er)

Testing Grounds website

 

Test Sites Workshop

TEST SITES WORKSHOPS

 11 – 14 June 2019

Testing Grounds

Melbourne

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As part of a residency at Testing Grounds, Melbourne, I am developing new work exploring dress at a civic scale and dressing practices for urban public space. This project responds to the fireside as a central dressing site.

Testing Grounds is fully open to the public and you are welcome to come by and see all the artists at work this week.

Thank you to Testing Grounds and City of Melbourne for your support through the Test Sites workshop program.

“Test Sites gives artists the opportunity to explore and experiment with creative ideas for temporary projects within the public realm. The program focuses on areas of interest in the city to engage artists in a civic dialogue in response to a specific site brief.”

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Tarryn Handcock, dressing site: fireside.

 

See: 

Charcoal + Rain

Gold(er)

Artificial Geology

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FURTHER INFORMATION:

Testing Grounds website

Test Sites information