Body Future

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Body Future, Design Tasmania. Pictures: Tarryn Handcock.

“In a world where fast fashion is failing our future, how could we transform the daily impact of our bodies to be of use to the planet? The answer could lie in our sweat or even our dead skin and dander according to two designers: Alice Potts from Royal College of the Arts (London) and Tarryn Handcock from RMIT (Melbourne)” – Design Tasmania

Body Future is an exhibition of work by Tarryn Handcock and Alice Potts, that explores the material potential of bodies, and the future of design.

Handcock’s work in the exhibition shows the potential of dust as an archival tool for measuring how the body interacts with its environment. The work highlights sustainability issues and our material traces in the world.

“Collections of dust can include the hair of our pets, textiles in our homes, the dusts we track in from the street, which then might contain traces of things like the modes of transport we use and the materials our roads are made from,” says Handcock. “As we study dust, we soon start to see we have this very material record of a specific time in history, of what life was like, as documented through the materials we use and how the body extends into the environment around us” – Tarryn Handcock

Body Future opens at Design Tasmania as a part of MONA FOMA festival on 15 January and continues to 1 March 2020.

Sweat: Bodily waste or art?
Design Tasmania’s executive director Claire Beale and Mona Foma Festival director Brian Ritchie get up close to the exhibition Body Future. Picture: Scott Gelston. Image source: The Advocate

More information can be found via Design Tasmania and MONA FOMA 2020 See also: The Dust Project and Design Lab Artist talk

Media coverage:

Experimental science meets slow fashion in Body Future, Art Guide Australia

Mona Foma: Body Future explores sweat and dust at Design Tasmania, The Examiner

Mona Foma Unveils Huge 2020 Program, The Music